Position of adverbs with verbs in compound tenses

Look at these sentences:

Elle a bien mangéShe ate well

J'ai beaucoup aimé le spectacle. I really liked the show.

In compounds tenses (e.g. past involving 'avoir' or 'être' as auxiliary verbs), some adverbs are placed between the auxiliary verb and the past participle. 

These include: assez, bien, beaucoup, bientôt, déjà, encore, enfin, jamais, mal, mieux, moins, souvent, toujours, trop and vite.

BUT 

Certain adverbs of time and manner can both be AT THE END or be AT THE START of the sentence: 

e.g. hier, aujourd'hui, avant-hier, après, autrefois,... (and some adverbs ending in -ment for emphasis)

Il s'est retourné lentement.He turned around slowly.

Lentement, il s'est retourné.Slowly, he turned around.

Hier, nous sommes allés à Marseille.Yesterday, we went to Marseille.

Nous sommes allés à Marseille hier.We went to Marseille yesterday.

BUT
you would NOT say "Nous sommes hier allés à Marseille." NOR "Nous sommes allés hier à Marseille."

AND

Adverbs of place and certain adverbs of time usually FOLLOW the past participle: 

e.g. tard, tôt,... and some adverbs ending in -ment

Il est parti tard.He left late.

Elle a compris facilement.She understood easily.

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Examples and resources

J'ai beaucoup aimé le spectacle. I really liked the show.
Il est parti tard.He left late.
Il s'est retourné lentement.He turned around slowly.
Hier, nous sommes allés à Marseille.Yesterday, we went to Marseille.
Lentement, il s'est retourné.Slowly, he turned around.
Nous sommes allés à Marseille hier.We went to Marseille yesterday.
Elle a compris facilement.She understood easily.
Hier tu as joué au foot.Yesterday, you played football.
Elle a bien mangéShe ate well
Tu as joué au foot hier.
You played football yesterday.
I'll be right with you...