conduite vs conduire

carole

Kwiziq community member

29 March 2018

4 replies

conduite vs conduire

In this sentence: Vous comparaissez devant le tribunal pour conduite en état d'ivresse

why is it not "pour conduire"

Thank you.  

This question relates to:
French lesson "Conjugate connaître, paraître and derivatives in Le Présent (present tense)"

Chris

Kwiziq community member

30 March 2018

30/03/18

"Conduite" is a noun : the conduct. It is not the participle of conduire even if they look the same. 

Alan

Kwiziq community member

30 March 2018

30/03/18

It's a noun, but in this context it means "driving" rather than "conduct".

Aurélie

Kwiziq language super star

30 March 2018

30/03/18

Bonjour Alan !

Yes here it's the colloquial judicial expression : "la conduite en état d'ivresse" = driving under the influence.

Don't forget that in English the -ing form of a verb can often be used as a noun (his driving is quite chaotic).

Bonne journée !

Alan

Kwiziq community member

30 March 2018

30/03/18

In French there seems to be a similar pattern - the feminine past participle can often be used as a noun, as in this case.

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