Cultural context for one of the examples.

MiaA1Kwiziq community member

Cultural context for one of the examples.

Hi, this is more a "is this something people use?"/"What does it mean to the person you say it to" question, not a grammar problem.

The example "La grossesse va bien à ta femme" comes off as eyebrow-raising-rude to my English speaking brain (maybe it's a regional difference? I'm American and from the southeast). Is this something people would actually say/use or would it get you side-eyed around the world? I feel like my brain must be taking it too literally.

Asked 2 years ago
AurélieKwiziq team memberCorrect answer

Bonjour Mia !

I found your question very interesting actually :)
In French, the term "grossesse" is exclusively used to mean pregnancy, and doesn't have any fat-shaming connotation, I'd even say it's the contrary: la grossesse is usually considered a beautiful thing in French culture.

What really struck me is the fact that until I read your comment, I hadn't ever thought of the etymology of the word, and its derivation from gros/grosse! And it reminded me of another way people use grosse in French, when referring to a pregnant animal on a farm for example: 
Ma jument est grosse.    My female horse is pregnant. 
-> The adjective for people is enceinte.

So thank you for this interesting question, it's always fascinating to reflect on one's own language:)

Bonne journée !

MaartenC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor

Are you taking it to mean something it doesn't, rather than too literally ?

la grossesse - (the) pregnancy

ChrisC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor

I bet you thought it meant "fat" or "heavy". :)

AnneC1Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

"Pregnancy suits your wife well" raised my eyebrows too (UK English). It comes over as a bit over-personal/ patronising/ objectifying, especially as it implies the speaker may not know the name of the wife in question. Mind you, one of the hazards of pregnancy is that everyone feels they can make personal comments about it.

AnneC1Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

"Pregnancy suits your wife well" raised my eyebrows too (UK English). It comes over as a bit over-personal/ patronising/ objectifying, especially as it implies the speaker may not know the name of the wife in question. Mind you, one of the hazards of pregnancy is that everyone feels they can make personal comments about it.

Cultural context for one of the examples.

Hi, this is more a "is this something people use?"/"What does it mean to the person you say it to" question, not a grammar problem.

The example "La grossesse va bien à ta femme" comes off as eyebrow-raising-rude to my English speaking brain (maybe it's a regional difference? I'm American and from the southeast). Is this something people would actually say/use or would it get you side-eyed around the world? I feel like my brain must be taking it too literally.

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