'Vouloir que' followed by a verb in the subjunctive which is not 'a desire for someone else to do something.'

StewartC1Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

'Vouloir que' followed by a verb in the subjunctive which is not 'a desire for someone else to do something.'

In a French grammar book I have it gives an example of 'vouloir que' being followed by a verb in the subjunctive which does not 'express a desire for someone else to do something,' which according to the Kwiziq lesson it should do.  

'Le réalisateur n'a pas voulu que son film sorte avant la rentrée.' (The director did not want his film to come out before September.)

Could you please advise.

Thank you.

 

Asked 1 month ago
CélineKwiziq team memberCorrect answer

Bonjour Stewart,

I am sorry it could a while to answer your  query. 

'vouloir que' is always followed by the subjunctive form. The lesson has now been updated accordingly.

Bonne journée!

JimC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor

As I understand it,  vouloir que + subjunctive means "to want something to happen"

Example   --  Je veux que vous soyez prêt à 8 heures précises.

                        (I want you to be ready at 8 o'clock precisely.)

Hope this helps.

ChrisC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor

For those with a knack for grammar: that situation also used to require the subjunctive in English.

I wish he were more attentive. Here, were is the subjunctive. Originally, the subjunctive was used in English just like in French: in situations of uncertainty or when someone was expressing a desire.

God save the Queen. ("save" is the subjunctive. You can recognize by the missing -s of the third person singular, i.e., not God saves the Queen).
God bless you.
Suffice it to say...
etc.

In modern English, we find ways to circumvent the subjunctive. Therefore, it only survived in such idiomatic phrases as quoted above.

I ask that he cease to annoy me. --> I ask that he should cease to annoy me.

The original subjunctive (cease) is replaced by "should cease". In French, the subjunctive still rules strong, whereas in English it has all but vanished.

'Vouloir que' followed by a verb in the subjunctive which is not 'a desire for someone else to do something.'

In a French grammar book I have it gives an example of 'vouloir que' being followed by a verb in the subjunctive which does not 'express a desire for someone else to do something,' which according to the Kwiziq lesson it should do.  

'Le réalisateur n'a pas voulu que son film sorte avant la rentrée.' (The director did not want his film to come out before September.)

Could you please advise.

Thank you.

 

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