Making comparisons with nouns: plus de... que, moins de... que, autant de... que

Making comparisons with nouns (e.g. I have more books than he (does), as opposed to I'm taller than he (is)) is different to making comparisons with adjectives, verbs or adverbs.

Look at these examples:

J'ai plus de livres que toi
I have more books than you (do).

Marie a autant de vêtements que sa mère
Marie has as many clothes as her mother (does).

Tu as moins de chaussures qu'elle.
You have fewer shoes than she (does).

 

Note that to compare nouns, you will use comparative words as follows:

English French

more [thing/s] than

plus de [chose/s] que
less/fewer [thing/s] than moins de [chose/s] que
as much/many [thing/s] as autant de [chose/s] que

Note that in all three forms, de is required before the noun. 

de becomes d' in front of a vowel or mute h

Whereas in English, you will need to use a subject pronoun after than (... than I (do), you (do), he/she (does)...), in French you will once again use the stress pronoun after que (... que moi, toi, lui/elle, nous, vous, eux/elles). You will also never repeat the verb with (do/am/have) afterwards:

J'ai plus d'œufs en chocolat que tu as toi.
I have more chocolate eggs than you do.

 

See also other Comparative structures:

Plus... plus..., moins... moins... = the more...the more..., the less...the less... (comparisons with phrases)
Better and better, worse and worse = de mieux en mieux, de pire en pire (comparisons)
De plus en plus and de moins en moins = more and more and less and less (comparisons with adjectives, adverbs, verbs)
De plus en plus de and de moins en moins de = more and more and less and less (comparisons of nouns)
Making comparisons with adjectives: plus... que, aussi... que, moins... que
Making comparisons with adverbs: plus... que, aussi... que, moins... que
Making comparisons with verbs: plus que, autant que, moins que

And for Superlative forms, see:

Le, la, les plus and le, la, les moins = the most and the least (superlatives of adjectives)
Meilleur, mieux, pire / plus mauvais, plus mal = better, best, worse and worst (irregular comparatives and superlatives)
Le plus and le moins = the most and the least (superlative of adverbs)

 

Learn more about these related French grammar topics

Examples and resources

Marie a autant de vêtements que sa mère
Marie has as many clothes as her mother (does).


J'ai plus de livres que toi
I have more books than you (do).



Tu as moins de chaussures qu'elle.
You have fewer shoes than she (does).


Q&A

Aleida

Kwiziq community member

9 October 2017

2 replies

Don't these two sentences mean the same thing?

"Nous avons DAVANTAGE d'enfants que lui" and "Nous avons PLUS D'enfants que lui" I put 'davantage' and it was marked wrong.

Ron

Kwiziq community member

11 October 2017

11/10/17

Bonsoir Aleida,
According to the Collins-Robert:
davantage de and plus de have the same meaning --> more.
I am uncertain the reason that «plus de» is more commonly used in this type of syntax, perhaps it is better for the pronunciation linguistic effect.

Bonne chance et bonne continuation

Chris

Kwiziq community member

17 October 2017

17/10/17

Hi Aleida, according to my understanding "davantage" and "plus" are synonyms. It is just that davantage is more formal. And you can't use it in comparisons where you would use plus as in "I have more apples than you" -- "J'ai plus de pommes que toi." You could not use davantage in this example.

-- Chris (not a native speaker).

Bonnie

Kwiziq community member

11 May 2017

3 replies

plu de plus de

do we have lessons explaining when to use plu de and plus de? Thanks Bonnie

Bonnie

Kwiziq community member

11 May 2017

11/05/17

sorry, I didn't word that very well. when to pronounce the s and when it is silent.

Aurélie

Kwiziq language super star

12 May 2017

12/05/17

Bonjour Bonnie !

The general rule here is as such:
- Never pronounce the "s" when "plus" has a negative meaning (no more, no ... left):
"Je n'ai plu[s] de beurre." (I have no butter left)
but
- Pronounce it in positive context most of the time, though it can be omitted:
"Il y a de plus en plu[s] / de plus en pluS de pollution." (more and more)

The only cases you need to pronounce it is when the meaning could be either negative or positive, for clarity.
For example, when using "ne...plus", as a lot of people would drop the "ne" in speech:
"Je fume plu[s]." = Je ne fume plus. = I don't smoke any more.
"Je fume pluS." = I smoke more.

Here are links to our related lessons:
https://progress.lawlessfrench.com/revision/grammar/how-to-say-more-and-more-less-and-less-nouns-de-plus-en-plus-de-de-moins-en-moins-de-comparisons
https://progress.lawlessfrench.com/revision/grammar/making-comparisons-with-nouns-plus-de-que-moins-de-que-autant-de-que-comparative
https://progress.lawlessfrench.com/revision/grammar/n-avoir-plus-de-to-have-none-left

I hope that's helpful!
À bientôt !

Bonnie

Kwiziq community member

12 May 2017

12/05/17

Very helpful! Also, thank you for pin pointing the links that address this question.

Bon week end,

Bonnie

Susan

Kwiziq community member

2 November 2016

2 replies

J'ai plus de livres que toi: the "s" in plus is pronounced.

Is this correct?

Aurélie

Kwiziq language super star

2 November 2016

2/11/16

Bonjour Susan !

Yes, it is correct, as "plus" is here used in a positive sense (meaning "more"), and not as a negation ("not... anymore"), you therefore need to pronounce the "s" (not all the time mind you, there are exceptions, but not there!) :)

Susan

Kwiziq community member

2 November 2016

2/11/16

Bonjour Aurélie,
This is good to know.
Merci!
Getting that for you now.