Le plus and le moins = the most and the least (superlative of adverbs)

Look at these cases of Adverbs in the Superlative:

Marie chante le plus fort
Marie sings the loudest.

Il est celui qui mange le plus bruyamment.
He is the one who eats the loudest.

Je suis celui qui a couru le moins vite.
I am the one who ran the least fast.

Cet ordinateur marche le moins bien.
This computer works the least well.

 

Note that to form the Superlative of adverbs, it is similar to the Superlative of adjectives, EXCEPT you only use the definite article le plus / le moins (there is NO agreement with adverbs, as they have NO gender).

Jeanne parle le plus doucement.
Jeanne speaks the most softly.



You NEVER say  ''Jeanne parle la plus doucemente.''


Here are other Superlative structures:
Le, la, les plus and le, la, les moins = the most and the least (superlatives of adjectives)

Meilleur, mieux, pire / plus mauvais, plus mal = better, best, worse and worst (irregular comparatives and superlatives)

And Comparative structures:
Plus... plus..., moins... moins... = the more...the more..., the less...the less... (comparisons with phrases)
Better and better, worse and worse = de mieux en mieux, de pire en pire (comparisons)
De plus en plus and de moins en moins = more and more and less and less (comparisons with adjectives, adverbs, verbs)
De plus en plus de and de moins en moins de = more and more and less and less (comparisons of nouns)
Making comparisons with adjectives: plus... que, aussi... que, moins... que
Making comparisons with adverbs: plus... que, aussi... que, moins... que
Making comparisons with verbs: plus que, autant que, moins que
Making comparisons with nouns: plus de... que, moins de... que, autant de... que

 

Learn more about these related French grammar topics

Examples and resources

Jeanne parle le plus doucement.
Jeanne speaks the most softly.


Je le ferai jeudi au plus tard.
I'll do it on Thursday at the latest.


Je suis celui qui a couru le moins vite.
I am the one who ran the least fast.


Il est celui qui mange le plus bruyamment.
He is the one who eats the loudest.



Cet ordinateur marche le moins bien.
This computer works the least well.


Marie chante le plus fort
Marie sings the loudest.


Q&A

Judy

Kwiziq community member

17 April 2018

1 reply

Note that to form the Superlative of adverbs, it is similar to the Superlative of adjectives, EXCEPT you only use the definite article le plus / le mo

Note that to form the Superlative of adverbs, it is similar to the Superlative of adjectives, EXCEPT you only use the definite article le plus / le moins (there is NO agreement with adverbs, as they have NO gender).  But one of the examples uses "au":Je le ferai jeudi au plus tard.
I'll do it on Thursday at the latest.

Chris

Kwiziq community member

17 April 2018

17/04/18

Hi Judy,

Au = à le, hence au plus tard = à le plus tard.

You see, "au" is just the definite article in disguise ;)

-- Chris (not a native speaker).

diana

Kwiziq community member

4 January 2018

1 reply

Can you say either le plus fort or le plus fortement. Both can be adverbs I think

Aurélie

Kwiziq language super star

4 January 2018

4/01/18

Bonjour Diana ! Actually, I can't think of an example where "fortement" would be used with the superlative form in French. I guess it's because "fortement" is used only in specific context (-> Je vous conseille fortement = I recommend strongly) which don't really work with superlative. "Fort" being used to say "loudly" or "hard", it's more likely to be used in the superlative: Je serre fort. Je serre le plus fort. I squeeze tight, I squeeze the tightest. I hope that's helpful!

John

Kwiziq community member

21 November 2017

2 replies

“Le moins vite” or “le plus lent”

Is one form preferred over the other or is it a matter of personal choice/context?

Chris

Kwiziq community member

22 November 2017

22/11/17

I guess that depends. The slowest would be "le plus lent", the least quick is "le moins vite". Usage would mostly be determined by context, I would say. -- Chris (not a native speaker).

Cécile

Kwiziq language super star

10 April 2018

10/04/18

Hi John,

Actually in 'le moins vite''vite' being an adverb its equivalent would be 'le plus lentement', meaning the same thing emphasis being on speed or lack of it:

Arrivez à votre destination le moins vite possible ( or le plus lentement possible)

'Lent' and its opposite 'rapide' are both adjectives.

Here are some examples :

C'est la voiture la plus rapide au monde.

C'est le moyen de transport le plus lent au monde.

Hope this helps!

Dean

Kwiziq community member

14 May 2017

1 reply

Peut-on utiliser "nettement" au lieu de "clairement?"

Aurélie

Kwiziq language super star

15 May 2017

15/05/17

Bonjour Dean ! It depends on context: "clairement" is usually used to express clarification, to make a notion or an explanation clearer (more understandable), whereas "nettement" is more physical (I see more neatly), or to mark a rupture, a clear (clear cut) difference from before. "Tu as expliqué la leçon clairement." (You explained the lesson clearly.) "Mon résultat est nettement différent du tien." (My result is clearly different from yours.) If you gave me the context you're referring to, it would be easier for me to tall you for sure :) I hope that's helpful! À bientôt !

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