Manquer (de) + thing = To miss / lack something

The verb manquer is often very troublesome for English speakers of French because its structure is reversed when it applies to emotions compared to events.

Look at these sentences with the verb manquer in a pragmatic sense:

Jacques a manqué son trainJacques missed his train

J'ai manqué l'écoleI missed school

Note that to say you missed a train or school, it's very straightforward.

ATTENTION:

To express lacking [something], you will use manquer de or d' + [thing].

You do not need to use the partitive articles (du, de l', de la, des) here, just as you wouldn't say I lack the sugar but simply I lack sugar:

Je manque de sucre pour faire ce gâteau.I lack sugar to make that cake.

Je manque d'argent pour payer mes factures I don't have enough money to pay my bills

Il manque toujours de courage.He always lacks courage.

When manquer de is used with rien (I lack nothing), you need to add the negation ne in front of the verb.
Je ne manque de rien.I lack nothing.
 

ATTENTION:

You cannot use manquer this way to miss a person (or thing) emotionally.
See Manquer (à) = To miss someone/something emotionally

 

 

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Examples and resources

Il manque toujours de courage.He always lacks courage.
Je manque de sucre pour faire ce gâteau.I lack sugar to make that cake.
Je ne manque rien.I don't miss anything.
Je ne manque de rien.I lack nothing.

to lack something


Je manque d'argent pour payer mes factures I don't have enough money to pay my bills

to miss an event


J'ai manqué l'écoleI missed school
Jacques a manqué son trainJacques missed his train
I'll be right with you...