Manque de ?

Joakim

Kwiziq community member

18 March 2016

2 replies

Manque de ?

I keep getting this one wrong despite having read the lesson multiple times. What property of X determines whether it's "manque X" or "manque de X"? It says manque de in the lesson, but surely l'├ęcole is "something" but does not need "de"?

This relates to:
Manquer (de) + thing = To miss / lack something -

Laura

Kwiziq language super star

21 March 2016

21/03/16

Bonjour Joakim,

It's a question of meaning.

When you mean "I miss" something (you missed the train, you missed school, you miss your plane) the noun is abstract and there's no de.

When you mean "I lack" (you lack sugar, you lack money, you lack time), the noun is concrete - you are physically missing the object - you need de.

Joakim

Kwiziq community member

21 March 2016

21/03/16

Ok, that makes sense, thank you. Although in a later exercise it was "manque de patience". Isn't patience also someting abstract?

Your answer

Login to submit your answer

Don't have an account yet? Join today

Think you've got all the answers?

Test your French to the CEFR standard

find your French level ┬╗
2800questions5727answers117,790users
I'll be right with you...